tamorapierce:

tamorapierce:

archiemcphee:

This stunning installation of 888,246 red ceramic poppies was created by ceramic artist Paul Cummins and stage designer Tom Piper in commemoration of the centennial of Britain’s involvement in World War I. Entitled Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red, each flower represents a British or Colonial military fatality.
This staggering installation is a work in progress, with the ceramic pippies being planted by volunteers in the dry moat that surrounds the Tower of London. The planting process began a few weeks ago and will continue throughout the summer until a final flower is symbolically planted on November 11, 2014.
Visit the Historic Royal Palaces website to learn more about this moving project. You can also follow the progress of the volunteer planters by following the #TowerPoppies on Twitter.
[via Colossal]

World War One began one hundred years ago this year.
The world was never the same.
The poppy represents the fallen soldier in general and the soldiers of WWI in particular, after the poem, “In Flanders Fields.”

In Flanders Fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses row on row
That mark our dead while in the sky
The larks still bravely singing fly
Scarce heard amidst the guns below tamorapierce:

tamorapierce:

archiemcphee:

This stunning installation of 888,246 red ceramic poppies was created by ceramic artist Paul Cummins and stage designer Tom Piper in commemoration of the centennial of Britain’s involvement in World War I. Entitled Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red, each flower represents a British or Colonial military fatality.
This staggering installation is a work in progress, with the ceramic pippies being planted by volunteers in the dry moat that surrounds the Tower of London. The planting process began a few weeks ago and will continue throughout the summer until a final flower is symbolically planted on November 11, 2014.
Visit the Historic Royal Palaces website to learn more about this moving project. You can also follow the progress of the volunteer planters by following the #TowerPoppies on Twitter.
[via Colossal]

World War One began one hundred years ago this year.
The world was never the same.
The poppy represents the fallen soldier in general and the soldiers of WWI in particular, after the poem, “In Flanders Fields.”

In Flanders Fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses row on row
That mark our dead while in the sky
The larks still bravely singing fly
Scarce heard amidst the guns below tamorapierce:

tamorapierce:

archiemcphee:

This stunning installation of 888,246 red ceramic poppies was created by ceramic artist Paul Cummins and stage designer Tom Piper in commemoration of the centennial of Britain’s involvement in World War I. Entitled Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red, each flower represents a British or Colonial military fatality.
This staggering installation is a work in progress, with the ceramic pippies being planted by volunteers in the dry moat that surrounds the Tower of London. The planting process began a few weeks ago and will continue throughout the summer until a final flower is symbolically planted on November 11, 2014.
Visit the Historic Royal Palaces website to learn more about this moving project. You can also follow the progress of the volunteer planters by following the #TowerPoppies on Twitter.
[via Colossal]

World War One began one hundred years ago this year.
The world was never the same.
The poppy represents the fallen soldier in general and the soldiers of WWI in particular, after the poem, “In Flanders Fields.”

In Flanders Fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses row on row
That mark our dead while in the sky
The larks still bravely singing fly
Scarce heard amidst the guns below tamorapierce:

tamorapierce:

archiemcphee:

This stunning installation of 888,246 red ceramic poppies was created by ceramic artist Paul Cummins and stage designer Tom Piper in commemoration of the centennial of Britain’s involvement in World War I. Entitled Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red, each flower represents a British or Colonial military fatality.
This staggering installation is a work in progress, with the ceramic pippies being planted by volunteers in the dry moat that surrounds the Tower of London. The planting process began a few weeks ago and will continue throughout the summer until a final flower is symbolically planted on November 11, 2014.
Visit the Historic Royal Palaces website to learn more about this moving project. You can also follow the progress of the volunteer planters by following the #TowerPoppies on Twitter.
[via Colossal]

World War One began one hundred years ago this year.
The world was never the same.
The poppy represents the fallen soldier in general and the soldiers of WWI in particular, after the poem, “In Flanders Fields.”

In Flanders Fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses row on row
That mark our dead while in the sky
The larks still bravely singing fly
Scarce heard amidst the guns below tamorapierce:

tamorapierce:

archiemcphee:

This stunning installation of 888,246 red ceramic poppies was created by ceramic artist Paul Cummins and stage designer Tom Piper in commemoration of the centennial of Britain’s involvement in World War I. Entitled Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red, each flower represents a British or Colonial military fatality.
This staggering installation is a work in progress, with the ceramic pippies being planted by volunteers in the dry moat that surrounds the Tower of London. The planting process began a few weeks ago and will continue throughout the summer until a final flower is symbolically planted on November 11, 2014.
Visit the Historic Royal Palaces website to learn more about this moving project. You can also follow the progress of the volunteer planters by following the #TowerPoppies on Twitter.
[via Colossal]

World War One began one hundred years ago this year.
The world was never the same.
The poppy represents the fallen soldier in general and the soldiers of WWI in particular, after the poem, “In Flanders Fields.”

In Flanders Fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses row on row
That mark our dead while in the sky
The larks still bravely singing fly
Scarce heard amidst the guns below tamorapierce:

tamorapierce:

archiemcphee:

This stunning installation of 888,246 red ceramic poppies was created by ceramic artist Paul Cummins and stage designer Tom Piper in commemoration of the centennial of Britain’s involvement in World War I. Entitled Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red, each flower represents a British or Colonial military fatality.
This staggering installation is a work in progress, with the ceramic pippies being planted by volunteers in the dry moat that surrounds the Tower of London. The planting process began a few weeks ago and will continue throughout the summer until a final flower is symbolically planted on November 11, 2014.
Visit the Historic Royal Palaces website to learn more about this moving project. You can also follow the progress of the volunteer planters by following the #TowerPoppies on Twitter.
[via Colossal]

World War One began one hundred years ago this year.
The world was never the same.
The poppy represents the fallen soldier in general and the soldiers of WWI in particular, after the poem, “In Flanders Fields.”

In Flanders Fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses row on row
That mark our dead while in the sky
The larks still bravely singing fly
Scarce heard amidst the guns below tamorapierce:

tamorapierce:

archiemcphee:

This stunning installation of 888,246 red ceramic poppies was created by ceramic artist Paul Cummins and stage designer Tom Piper in commemoration of the centennial of Britain’s involvement in World War I. Entitled Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red, each flower represents a British or Colonial military fatality.
This staggering installation is a work in progress, with the ceramic pippies being planted by volunteers in the dry moat that surrounds the Tower of London. The planting process began a few weeks ago and will continue throughout the summer until a final flower is symbolically planted on November 11, 2014.
Visit the Historic Royal Palaces website to learn more about this moving project. You can also follow the progress of the volunteer planters by following the #TowerPoppies on Twitter.
[via Colossal]

World War One began one hundred years ago this year.
The world was never the same.
The poppy represents the fallen soldier in general and the soldiers of WWI in particular, after the poem, “In Flanders Fields.”

In Flanders Fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses row on row
That mark our dead while in the sky
The larks still bravely singing fly
Scarce heard amidst the guns below tamorapierce:

tamorapierce:

archiemcphee:

This stunning installation of 888,246 red ceramic poppies was created by ceramic artist Paul Cummins and stage designer Tom Piper in commemoration of the centennial of Britain’s involvement in World War I. Entitled Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red, each flower represents a British or Colonial military fatality.
This staggering installation is a work in progress, with the ceramic pippies being planted by volunteers in the dry moat that surrounds the Tower of London. The planting process began a few weeks ago and will continue throughout the summer until a final flower is symbolically planted on November 11, 2014.
Visit the Historic Royal Palaces website to learn more about this moving project. You can also follow the progress of the volunteer planters by following the #TowerPoppies on Twitter.
[via Colossal]

World War One began one hundred years ago this year.
The world was never the same.
The poppy represents the fallen soldier in general and the soldiers of WWI in particular, after the poem, “In Flanders Fields.”

In Flanders Fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses row on row
That mark our dead while in the sky
The larks still bravely singing fly
Scarce heard amidst the guns below tamorapierce:

tamorapierce:

archiemcphee:

This stunning installation of 888,246 red ceramic poppies was created by ceramic artist Paul Cummins and stage designer Tom Piper in commemoration of the centennial of Britain’s involvement in World War I. Entitled Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red, each flower represents a British or Colonial military fatality.
This staggering installation is a work in progress, with the ceramic pippies being planted by volunteers in the dry moat that surrounds the Tower of London. The planting process began a few weeks ago and will continue throughout the summer until a final flower is symbolically planted on November 11, 2014.
Visit the Historic Royal Palaces website to learn more about this moving project. You can also follow the progress of the volunteer planters by following the #TowerPoppies on Twitter.
[via Colossal]

World War One began one hundred years ago this year.
The world was never the same.
The poppy represents the fallen soldier in general and the soldiers of WWI in particular, after the poem, “In Flanders Fields.”

In Flanders Fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses row on row
That mark our dead while in the sky
The larks still bravely singing fly
Scarce heard amidst the guns below tamorapierce:

tamorapierce:

archiemcphee:

This stunning installation of 888,246 red ceramic poppies was created by ceramic artist Paul Cummins and stage designer Tom Piper in commemoration of the centennial of Britain’s involvement in World War I. Entitled Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red, each flower represents a British or Colonial military fatality.
This staggering installation is a work in progress, with the ceramic pippies being planted by volunteers in the dry moat that surrounds the Tower of London. The planting process began a few weeks ago and will continue throughout the summer until a final flower is symbolically planted on November 11, 2014.
Visit the Historic Royal Palaces website to learn more about this moving project. You can also follow the progress of the volunteer planters by following the #TowerPoppies on Twitter.
[via Colossal]

World War One began one hundred years ago this year.
The world was never the same.
The poppy represents the fallen soldier in general and the soldiers of WWI in particular, after the poem, “In Flanders Fields.”

In Flanders Fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses row on row
That mark our dead while in the sky
The larks still bravely singing fly
Scarce heard amidst the guns below

tamorapierce:

tamorapierce:

archiemcphee:

This stunning installation of 888,246 red ceramic poppies was created by ceramic artist Paul Cummins and stage designer Tom Piper in commemoration of the centennial of Britain’s involvement in World War I. Entitled Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red, each flower represents a British or Colonial military fatality.

This staggering installation is a work in progress, with the ceramic pippies being planted by volunteers in the dry moat that surrounds the Tower of London. The planting process began a few weeks ago and will continue throughout the summer until a final flower is symbolically planted on November 11, 2014.

Visit the Historic Royal Palaces website to learn more about this moving project. You can also follow the progress of the volunteer planters by following the #TowerPoppies on Twitter.

[via Colossal]

World War One began one hundred years ago this year.

The world was never the same.

The poppy represents the fallen soldier in general and the soldiers of WWI in particular, after the poem, “In Flanders Fields.”

In Flanders Fields the poppies blow

Between the crosses row on row

That mark our dead while in the sky

The larks still bravely singing fly

Scarce heard amidst the guns below

Q

mccoydarling asked:

Please talk forever about Helen and ancient greek you are so enpoint

A

elucipher:

in the iliad helen speaks the last lament for hector. the only man in troy who showed her kindness is slain—and now, helen says, πάντες δέ με πεφρίκασιν, all men shudder at me. she doesn’t speak in the iliiad again.

homer isn’t cruel to helen; her story is cruel enough. in the conjectured era of the trojan war, women are mothers by twelve, grandmothers by twenty-four, and buried by thirty. the lineage of mycenaean families passes through daughters: royal women are kingmakers, and command a little power, but they are bartered like jewels (the iliad speaks again and again of helen and all her wealth). helen is the most beautiful woman in the world, golden with kharis, the seductive grace that arouses desire. she is coveted by men beyond all reason. after she is seized by paris and compelled by aphrodite to love him against her will—in other writings of the myth, she loves him freely—she is never out of danger.

the helen of the iliad is clever and powerful and capricious and kind and melancholy: full of fury toward paris and aphrodite, longing for sparta and its women, fear for her own life. she condemns herself before others can. in book vi, as war blazes and roars below them, helen tells hector, on us the gods have set an evil destiny: that we should be a singer’s theme for generations to come—as if she knows that, in the centuries after, men will rarely write of paris’ vanity and hubris and lust, his violation of the sacred guest-pact, his refusal to relent and avoid war with the achaeans. instead they’ll write and paint the beautiful, perfidious, ruinous woman whose hands are red with the blood of men, and call her not queen of sparta but helen of troy: a forced marriage to the city that desired and hated her. she is an eidolon made of want and rapture and dread and resentment.

homer doesn’t condemn helen—and in the odyssey she’s seen reconciled with menelaus. she’s worshipped in sparta as a symbol of sexual power for centuries, until the end of roman rule: pausanias writes that pilgrims come to see the remains of her birth-egg, hung from the roof of a temple in the spartan acropolis; spartan girls dance and sing songs praising one another’s beauty and strength as part of rites of passage, leading them from parthenos to nýmphē, virgin to bride. cults of helen appear across greece, italy, turkey—as far as palestine—celebrating her shining beauty; they sacrifice to her as if she were a goddess. much of this is quickly forgotten. 

every age finds new words to hate helen, but they are old ways of hating: deceiver and scandal and insatiate whore. she is euripides’ bitchwhore and hesiod’s kalon kakon (“beautiful evil”) and clement of alexandria’s adulterous beauty and whore and shakespeare’s strumpet and proctor’s trull and flurt of whoredom and schiller’s pricktease and levin’s adulterous witch. her lusts damned a golden world to die, they say. pandora’s box lies between a woman’s thighs. helen is a symbol of how men’s desire for women becomes the evidence by which women are condemned, abused, reviled.  

but no cage of words can hold her fast. she is elusive; she yields nothing. she has outlasted civilisations, and is beautiful still. before troy is ash and ruin she has already heard all the slander of the centuries; and at last she turns her face away—as if to say: i am not for you

thosenerdyfeels:

beeishappy:

Stephen Colbert on Late Night with Seth Meyers

TCR | 2007.03.12 | It reads: “Dear Stephen, As editor-in-chief of Marvel, I am burdened with the handling of our character’s estates and the sad event that a hero should perish before his time. Captain America’s will was read last Friday, and while heavy hearted, I am proud to announce the star spangled Avenger has bequeathed his most valuable possession, his indestructible shield, to the only man he believed had the red, white, and blue balls to carry the mantle. Stephen Colbert. Welcome to the Marvel Universe. Sincerely, Joe Quesada.

How can you but just love this?
thosenerdyfeels:

beeishappy:

Stephen Colbert on Late Night with Seth Meyers

TCR | 2007.03.12 | It reads: “Dear Stephen, As editor-in-chief of Marvel, I am burdened with the handling of our character’s estates and the sad event that a hero should perish before his time. Captain America’s will was read last Friday, and while heavy hearted, I am proud to announce the star spangled Avenger has bequeathed his most valuable possession, his indestructible shield, to the only man he believed had the red, white, and blue balls to carry the mantle. Stephen Colbert. Welcome to the Marvel Universe. Sincerely, Joe Quesada.

How can you but just love this?
thosenerdyfeels:

beeishappy:

Stephen Colbert on Late Night with Seth Meyers

TCR | 2007.03.12 | It reads: “Dear Stephen, As editor-in-chief of Marvel, I am burdened with the handling of our character’s estates and the sad event that a hero should perish before his time. Captain America’s will was read last Friday, and while heavy hearted, I am proud to announce the star spangled Avenger has bequeathed his most valuable possession, his indestructible shield, to the only man he believed had the red, white, and blue balls to carry the mantle. Stephen Colbert. Welcome to the Marvel Universe. Sincerely, Joe Quesada.

How can you but just love this?
thosenerdyfeels:

beeishappy:

Stephen Colbert on Late Night with Seth Meyers

TCR | 2007.03.12 | It reads: “Dear Stephen, As editor-in-chief of Marvel, I am burdened with the handling of our character’s estates and the sad event that a hero should perish before his time. Captain America’s will was read last Friday, and while heavy hearted, I am proud to announce the star spangled Avenger has bequeathed his most valuable possession, his indestructible shield, to the only man he believed had the red, white, and blue balls to carry the mantle. Stephen Colbert. Welcome to the Marvel Universe. Sincerely, Joe Quesada.

How can you but just love this?
thosenerdyfeels:

beeishappy:

Stephen Colbert on Late Night with Seth Meyers

TCR | 2007.03.12 | It reads: “Dear Stephen, As editor-in-chief of Marvel, I am burdened with the handling of our character’s estates and the sad event that a hero should perish before his time. Captain America’s will was read last Friday, and while heavy hearted, I am proud to announce the star spangled Avenger has bequeathed his most valuable possession, his indestructible shield, to the only man he believed had the red, white, and blue balls to carry the mantle. Stephen Colbert. Welcome to the Marvel Universe. Sincerely, Joe Quesada.

How can you but just love this?
thosenerdyfeels:

beeishappy:

Stephen Colbert on Late Night with Seth Meyers

TCR | 2007.03.12 | It reads: “Dear Stephen, As editor-in-chief of Marvel, I am burdened with the handling of our character’s estates and the sad event that a hero should perish before his time. Captain America’s will was read last Friday, and while heavy hearted, I am proud to announce the star spangled Avenger has bequeathed his most valuable possession, his indestructible shield, to the only man he believed had the red, white, and blue balls to carry the mantle. Stephen Colbert. Welcome to the Marvel Universe. Sincerely, Joe Quesada.

How can you but just love this?
thosenerdyfeels:

beeishappy:

Stephen Colbert on Late Night with Seth Meyers

TCR | 2007.03.12 | It reads: “Dear Stephen, As editor-in-chief of Marvel, I am burdened with the handling of our character’s estates and the sad event that a hero should perish before his time. Captain America’s will was read last Friday, and while heavy hearted, I am proud to announce the star spangled Avenger has bequeathed his most valuable possession, his indestructible shield, to the only man he believed had the red, white, and blue balls to carry the mantle. Stephen Colbert. Welcome to the Marvel Universe. Sincerely, Joe Quesada.

How can you but just love this?
thosenerdyfeels:

beeishappy:

Stephen Colbert on Late Night with Seth Meyers

TCR | 2007.03.12 | It reads: “Dear Stephen, As editor-in-chief of Marvel, I am burdened with the handling of our character’s estates and the sad event that a hero should perish before his time. Captain America’s will was read last Friday, and while heavy hearted, I am proud to announce the star spangled Avenger has bequeathed his most valuable possession, his indestructible shield, to the only man he believed had the red, white, and blue balls to carry the mantle. Stephen Colbert. Welcome to the Marvel Universe. Sincerely, Joe Quesada.

How can you but just love this?
thosenerdyfeels:

beeishappy:

Stephen Colbert on Late Night with Seth Meyers

TCR | 2007.03.12 | It reads: “Dear Stephen, As editor-in-chief of Marvel, I am burdened with the handling of our character’s estates and the sad event that a hero should perish before his time. Captain America’s will was read last Friday, and while heavy hearted, I am proud to announce the star spangled Avenger has bequeathed his most valuable possession, his indestructible shield, to the only man he believed had the red, white, and blue balls to carry the mantle. Stephen Colbert. Welcome to the Marvel Universe. Sincerely, Joe Quesada.

How can you but just love this?
thosenerdyfeels:

beeishappy:

Stephen Colbert on Late Night with Seth Meyers

TCR | 2007.03.12 | It reads: “Dear Stephen, As editor-in-chief of Marvel, I am burdened with the handling of our character’s estates and the sad event that a hero should perish before his time. Captain America’s will was read last Friday, and while heavy hearted, I am proud to announce the star spangled Avenger has bequeathed his most valuable possession, his indestructible shield, to the only man he believed had the red, white, and blue balls to carry the mantle. Stephen Colbert. Welcome to the Marvel Universe. Sincerely, Joe Quesada.

How can you but just love this?

thosenerdyfeels:

beeishappy:

Stephen Colbert on Late Night with Seth Meyers

image

TCR | 2007.03.12 | It reads: “Dear Stephen, As editor-in-chief of Marvel, I am burdened with the handling of our character’s estates and the sad event that a hero should perish before his time. Captain America’s will was read last Friday, and while heavy hearted, I am proud to announce the star spangled Avenger has bequeathed his most valuable possession, his indestructible shield, to the only man he believed had the red, white, and blue balls to carry the mantle. Stephen Colbert. Welcome to the Marvel Universe. Sincerely, Joe Quesada.

How can you but just love this?

(via themarysue)

“The Law of “Fuck Yes or No” states that when you want to get involved with someone new, in whatever capacity, they must inspire you to say “Fuck Yes” in order for you to proceed with them.
The Law of “Fuck Yes or No” also states that when you want to get involved with someone new, in whatever capacity, THEY must respond with a “Fuck Yes” in order for you to proceed with them.”
— Lovely post about the law of Fuck Yes by Mark Manson, sent to me by someone on Twitter! 

Alison Bechdel awarded MacArthur Grant

capegraphicnovels:

imageSuper exciting news!

Graphic memoirist Alison Bechdel has been named one of 21 winners of a $625,000 MacArthur “genius” grant for “changing our notions of the contemporary memoir and expanding the expressive potential of the graphic form”.

Given out yearly, the no-strings-attached stipends are paid out over five years and are intended to allow recipients “maximum freedom to follow their own creative visions”. They are widely known as “genius” grants, and have gone in the past to literary names including Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Junot Diaz, and William Gaddis.

Getting the call was, said Bechdel, “crazy, like someone had almost hit me, like a physical blow”. “I thought I was going to faint,” she said. “I feel like I’ve been in a state of shock. Getting this kind of recognition from the MacArthur Foundation, I can feel it already changing my life. I’m having to adjust to the fact this has happened, so I must be doing something worthwhile. To have that kind of confidence put into my work is a huge gift, and I’m going to work very, very hard to live up to those expectations.”

Read the full article at the Guardian.

desertlungs:

silennemorte:

az vagy amit megiszol?

fuck
“I want to do a rom-com with Melissa McCarthy. I even told her that at an awards show, and she said ‘Yes, Let’s do it!’”

Idris Elba, on his dream role, to US Weekly (via camewiththeframe)

Where she’s a high powered executive neat freak and he’s sort of slovenly. I want this like air.

(via barefootdramaturg)

oh my god, shut up and take my money

(via mizkit)

Can we start a kickstarter for this?

(via deducecanoe)

As if I and the world can’t love Idris Elba more.

(via amandaexmachina)

(via azurelazures)

vivienleighforever:

Vivien Leigh and Ingrid Bergman, 1957.

(via organized-clutter)

stand-up-comic-gifs:

Congrats to Michael Che, new co-anchor for Weekend Update! stand-up-comic-gifs:

Congrats to Michael Che, new co-anchor for Weekend Update!