i-effed-it-all-up:

no, i don’t watch that show, but i do follow its developments extensively via tumblr

(via theuncertainhour)

Repeat after me, folks: romantic plotlines don’t ruin female characters.

A female character isn’t weak because she has normal human emotions. She isn’t anti-feminist because she has vulnerabilities. There’s a difference between a female character existing entirely to be in love with the male character and a female character who happens to have a romantic subplot as part of her story.

It isn’t feminist to insist that female characters have to be “badass” unfeeling robots, detached from absolutely anything considered “feminine,” including, apparently, emotions. Sure, we don’t want female characters to be damsels in distress, but swinging in the other direction, to cardboard-cutout-badass-making-quips, isn’t much better. Good female characters appear human. And sorry, romance-haters, but love is a part of that.

Rhiannon, FeministFiction, “Down With Love” (via tiorickyaoi)

ZOMG READ IT. REEEAAADDDD IT!

(via geekbap)

besides, being “badass” normally means acting like idealized men only with boobs. which is dumb.

(via splinteredstar)

This is actually something I consider super important. It can be refreshing to see a woman character who doesn’t have romance subplot, because so many women characters are seen as as extensions of the male hero. But people can fall into a trap of judging women characters as automatically less if they do fall in love.

I really loved the way Captain America: the Winter Soldier handled Steve and Natasha’s friendship. I like that they didn’t hook up. But there were some reactions I saw that implied (or outright stated) that this made Natasha a superior character compared to other MCU women. (Jane Foster, for instance, gets a lot of contempt for daring to be physically attracted to Thor.)

The whole concept really opens itself up to concern trolling. Any woman character who has a romantic subplot suddenly becomes “just a love interest.” See, it has nothing to do with hating the character for getting between your perfect boyslash, or for daring to touch your darling with her girly bits. You’re just very concerned about the integrity of her character. No one, of course, ever worries that the male half of the pairing might become “just a love interest.” One big example I can think of with this, was when the first Star Trek reboot movie came out, and so many Kirk/Spock fans suddenly became so worried about Uhura’s character. (And I’ll talk a little more about how race can factor into this further down.)

This idea can create other kinds of concern trolling. There’s a the recurring idea that woman character X is so awesome she doesn’t need a man. Which may sound fine on the surface, but it becomes just another way of bringing her down should she enter a relationship. I’ve seen this with Sara from White Collar, with Sara bashers insisting that Sara would be awesome if she weren’t dating Neal, or that she’s too smart to date Neal. (No one ever suggests Peter is too smart to date Neal, so I guess they think he’s stupider than Sara.)

This whole “doesn’t need a man” thing can take a racist edge as well. The stereotype of the “strong Black woman” is well entrenched, but takes on fresh life in fandom, when, for instance, Abbie from Sleepy Hollow is declared to be too tough and independent to need a relationship with Ichabod. (Fine, she doesn’t need a relationship. But what if she wants one?)

Incidentally, the only time I’ve seen the whole “too awesome to ship” thing applied to male character is Sam Wilson from the MCU. Do I think it’s a coincidence that the sole example of this that I’ve seen applied to a man is aimed at a Black man? WHY NO I DON’T. Once, again no one seems concerned that Bucky or Tony are too awesome to ship with Steve. Are they simply inferior to Sam?

So, um, yeah. I’m not sure I’m really saying anything that the original post doesn’t already say, and I guess the conclusion that fandom is sexist and racist is nothing new, but this is something I’ve thought a lot about.

(via veleda-k)

(via frith-in-thorns)

“The truth is, everyone likes to look down on someone. If your favorites are all avant-garde writers who throw in Sanskrit and German, you can look down on everyone. If your favorites are all Oprah Book Club books, you can at least look down on mystery readers. Mystery readers have sci-fi readers. Sci-fi can look down on fantasy. And yes, fantasy readers have their own snobbishness. I’ll bet this, though: in a hundred years, people will be writing a lot more dissertations on Harry Potter than on John Updike. Look, Charles Dickens wrote popular fiction. Shakespeare wrote popular fiction - until he wrote his sonnets, desperate to show the literati of his day that he was real artist. Edgar Allan Poe tied himself in knots because no one realized he was a genius. The core of the problem is how we want to define “literature”. The Latin root simply means “letters”. Those letters are either delivered - they connect with an audience - or they don’t. For some, that audience is a few thousand college professors and some critics. For others, its twenty million women desperate for romance in their lives. Those connections happen because the books successfully communicate something real about the human experience. Sure, there are trashy books that do really well, but that’s because there are trashy facets of humanity. What people value in their books - and thus what they count as literature - really tells you more about them than it does about the book.”

Brent Weeks (via victoriousvocabulary)

BAM

(via starsandatoms)

(via frith-in-thorns)

mariyapilipenko:

Last semester I did a song book to one of my favorite russian war songs. These are a few spreads that I like from it. The song is about a wounded soldier and all the things that he will never have. It’s super depressing and haunting, which is kind of why I like it. I translated the words as best as I could (better than google) and decided to paint using water color, rip my painting and then piece them back together. I was really happy with how it came out, considering that I had never done something like this before.
To see more of this book, click below…
https://mariya-pilipenko.squarespace.com/illustration/#/not-for-me-songbook/ mariyapilipenko:

Last semester I did a song book to one of my favorite russian war songs. These are a few spreads that I like from it. The song is about a wounded soldier and all the things that he will never have. It’s super depressing and haunting, which is kind of why I like it. I translated the words as best as I could (better than google) and decided to paint using water color, rip my painting and then piece them back together. I was really happy with how it came out, considering that I had never done something like this before.
To see more of this book, click below…
https://mariya-pilipenko.squarespace.com/illustration/#/not-for-me-songbook/ mariyapilipenko:

Last semester I did a song book to one of my favorite russian war songs. These are a few spreads that I like from it. The song is about a wounded soldier and all the things that he will never have. It’s super depressing and haunting, which is kind of why I like it. I translated the words as best as I could (better than google) and decided to paint using water color, rip my painting and then piece them back together. I was really happy with how it came out, considering that I had never done something like this before.
To see more of this book, click below…
https://mariya-pilipenko.squarespace.com/illustration/#/not-for-me-songbook/

mariyapilipenko:

Last semester I did a song book to one of my favorite russian war songs. These are a few spreads that I like from it. The song is about a wounded soldier and all the things that he will never have. It’s super depressing and haunting, which is kind of why I like it. I translated the words as best as I could (better than google) and decided to paint using water color, rip my painting and then piece them back together. I was really happy with how it came out, considering that I had never done something like this before.

To see more of this book, click below…

https://mariya-pilipenko.squarespace.com/illustration/#/not-for-me-songbook/

(via spx)

nikoguardia:

Rockwell meets Bob’s

(via spx)

jessicamerizan:


Wtnv + trees

Zen philosophy for your day! jessicamerizan:


Wtnv + trees

Zen philosophy for your day! jessicamerizan:


Wtnv + trees

Zen philosophy for your day! jessicamerizan:


Wtnv + trees

Zen philosophy for your day! jessicamerizan:


Wtnv + trees

Zen philosophy for your day! jessicamerizan:


Wtnv + trees

Zen philosophy for your day! jessicamerizan:


Wtnv + trees

Zen philosophy for your day! jessicamerizan:


Wtnv + trees

Zen philosophy for your day! jessicamerizan:


Wtnv + trees

Zen philosophy for your day!

jessicamerizan:

Wtnv + trees

Zen philosophy for your day!

Guess who is a brunette again?